Monkeypox Declared Global Health Emergency: WHO

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The World Health Organization declared a global health emergency on Saturday due to the rapid spread of monkeypox and its outbreak. More than 16,000 cases of monkeypox have been reported so far this year in more than 60 different countries, with five fatalities occurring in Africa.

In the most current outbreak outside of Africa, the viral disease, which spreads through close contact and typically causes flu-like symptoms and pus-filled skin sores, has been primarily affecting men who have intercourse with other men.

The highest level of warning assigned by the WHO is “public health emergency of worldwide significance.” The announcement aims to raise awareness that a planned, global reaction is required. This may open up funding and encourage international cooperation in the exchange of medicines and vaccines.

During a press conference in Geneva, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus announced his decision to proclaim the health emergency and acknowledged that the committee had been unable to come to an agreement.

The WHO has determined that the risk of monkeypox is moderate worldwide and in all regions, with the exception of the European region, where we have determined that the risk is high.

Even though there is currently little chance of interfering with international transportation, there is an obvious possibility of subsequent global spread. We currently have an outbreak that has quickly spread throughout the globe via new means of transmission, about which we know much too little, and that satisfies the requirements of the International Health Regulations.

Tedros announced a set of recommendations for four groups of countries,

Those that have not yet reported a case of monkeypox, or have not reported a case for more than 21 days.

To improve all facets of the outbreak response, activate or build multi-sectoral coordination mechanisms in the health sector.

Create plans to prevent stigmatizing and discriminating against anyone or any population who may be impacted by monkeypox.

Establish and expand national monitoring systems for epidemic diseases, including availability to reliable, inexpensive, and precise diagnostic testing for illnesses similar to monkeypox.

Increase the capacity for detection via educating the public and educating healthcare professionals.

Those who haven’t reported a monkeypox case yet or haven’t reported a case in more than 21 days.

To improve all facets of the outbreak response, activate or build multi-sectoral coordination mechanisms in the health sector. Create plans to prevent stigmatising and discriminating against anyone or any population who may be impacted by monkeypox.

Establish and expand national monitoring systems for epidemic diseases, including availability to reliable, inexpensive, and precise diagnostic testing for illnesses similar to monkeypox.

Increase the capacity for detection via educating the public and educating healthcare professionals.

those who have recently imported cases of monkeypox and are being transmitted from person to person. This includes suggestions for putting into action a planned response to halt transmission and safeguard vulnerable groups.

Implementing a coordinated response: Take efforts to prevent the spread of monkeypox from person to person. In addition to strengthening the afflicted communities and offering them assistance,

raising awareness and defending vulnerable and at-risk individuals through involving and defending communities.

Increase public health and surveillance efforts, and send weekly reports to WHO.

For the duration of the infectious period, isolate cases. Cases should receive advice on how to reduce the risk of further transmission while they are in isolation.

Conduct contact tracing among those who have come into touch with anyone who may be a case of monkeypox that is suspected, probable, or proven. Establish clinical management, infection prevention and control, PPE use, and train healthcare professionals in these areas.
Make every effort to prevent monkeypox by using new or existing vaccinations.

The third category of nations includes those where monkeypox can spread from animals to people.

To monitor and manage the risk of animal-to-human and human-to-animal transmission in natural settings, establish or activate collaborative One Health coordination or other procedures. Conduct thorough case studies to identify transmission trends.

The fourth category includes nations with pharmaceutical and vaccine manufacturing capabilities.

States and producers should increase the supply of medical countermeasures.

According to the demands of the public health, the WHO will make sure that diagnostics, treatments, vaccinations, and other necessary supplies are made available.

Also Read: https://clipper28.com/en/ed-arrests-bengal-minister-partha-chatterjee/

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